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Top 25 Bass Rap Songs Of All Time

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Rap is many things, but iconic bass rap songs make it the unstoppable musical force that it is. Too catchy by far to ignore or forget, these songs are some of the most iconic music in history. Not just for their bass lines, but for everything that makes them what they are.

Here are 25 incredible bass rap songs that have become hard political anthems and unstoppable club jams.

1. X Gon’ Give It To Ya – DMX

A late party jam best known for its appearance on the soundtrack of Deadpool, 90s legend DMX scored a huge hit in 2012 and had a revival in 2014. The unmistakable, thudding bass line gives this song a drive that DMX’s lyrics ride to a higher level.

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2. What You Gon’ Do – Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz

A 2009 jam by Lil Jon, and like many of his songs, it’s a straight-up celebration of party culture. What sells this song is its incredible, thumping bass line that he lays his rhymes over. It’s not a very deep song, but it’s fun and unstoppable; the thudding percussion line gives it the power the lyrics need.

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3. Come and See Me – Ludacris featuring Big K.R.I.T.

With booming bass and slapping drums combined with space-age synths, “Come and See Me” is a trade of witty lyrics and sharp rhymes between Ludacris and Big K.R.I.T. This 2015 hit came at the height of Ludacris’ career, and while he’s fallen off since then, this song reminds us of how good he can be.

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4. The Humpty Dance – Digital Underground

This 1990 throwback, also called “Humpty Hump,” was a classic party jam from rap’s pop era. It has the credibility of an amazing flow and an unstoppable beat backing it up. Shock G’s tight rhymes give his silly lyrics a weight that they wouldn’t otherwise have, and this song was a big and enduring hit.

5. Throw It Up – Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz

This 2015 party jam isn’t anything deep. With the East Side Boyz, Lil Jon makes music about parties and drinking, and about getting drunk at parties, which is basically to have a good time. But it’s a really good time, with a hard-to-ignore beat and a flow that while not great is still good.

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6. Ballin’ – Logic

Bouncy and fast, “Ballin’” is, appropriate to its title, about wealth and braggadocio. It’s certainly not very deep, but it doesn’t have to be. Boastful raps are as much a part of the history of the genre as laments about the dangers of black life in America.

7. Bad Boyz – Shyne Featuring Barrington Levy

Not the same song as the 1990s classic by Inner Circle. “Bad Boyz” is a mid-2000s hit with a great bass line. Released while Shyne was in prison for a 1999 nightclub shooting, it gives a candid look at the inside of American culture. After his release from prison in 2009, he returned to Belize and became a successful politician.

8. Boyz-n-the-Hood – Eazy-E

Released on Ruthless Records in 1987 and re-released nationally the same year, “Boyz-N-The-Hood” predates Eazy-E’s collaboration with Ice Cube and M.C. Ren. It’s never had an official release under N.W.A., but the song is no less of a historical great for that. This song represents the start of the Gangsta genre.

9. Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It – Ice Cube

Since the early 2000s, Ice Cube has been more known for acting the role of a cop than for his legendary part in N.W.A. This 2008 song is a rejection of the idea that his recurring role on TV’s Law and Order is anything that changes who he is. In it, he says that everything he is is because of his music, and he’s right.

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10. 2 of Amerikaz Most Wanted – 2pac Featuring Snoop Dogg

Recorded shortly after Snoop Dogg’s acquittal of murder charges and 2pac’s release from jail. A celebration of freedom from two men who, at the time, were considered among the most dangerous musicians in America. This absolute classic has a beat that will stay in the listener’s head all day.

11. Gangsta’s Paradise – Coolio

One of the biggest classics in the pantheon of rap music, “Gangsta’s Paradise” is so big that it’s hard to sum up. It wasn’t just big for a rap song, it was big. Period. From 1995 to 1997, it was a huge chart hit, reaching high on the Billboard Hot 100. It was inescapable. And it was worth listening to.

12. Money in the Grave – Drake featuring Rick Ross

This 2019 song by Drake has a great bass line. The music tests the low end of good sound systems and bests most. While its lyrical line is a little basic for all its verbal complexity, the music is where this song shines, and Drake and Rick Ross’s lines complement each other.

13. Nuthin’ But A G Thang – Dr. Dre featuring Snoop Dogg

Dr. Dre’s album, The Chronic, changed the entire arc of popular music forever. Introducing the classic “synth & bass” sound of 1990s Gangsta rap with killer sounds and some of the tightest rhymes ever heard. This album instantly made half of the rappers that came before him look like clowns. An instant classic, “Nuthin’ But A G Thang” introduced Dr. Dre as a solo artist after his time with N.W.A.

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14. Still D.R.E. – Dr. Dre featuring Snoop Dogg

Recorded 18 years after “Nuthin’ But A G Thang,” 2011’s “Still D.R.E.” shows without question that Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg still have it. The rhymes are as tight as ever, the bassline is easily as good in its own way as the earlier 90s classic, and the song shows two aging veterans of the art still have what made them special in the first place.

15. Country Ass N**** – Nelly Featuring T.I. and 2 Chainz

With a sound system-testing bass line and a twisting, complex lyrical line, “Country Ass N****” kills. Nelly, T.I., and 2 Chainz don’t have a bad lyric between them, and the line passes between them effortlessly. This 2011 song is great and has gotten better with time.

16. Who Am I (What’s My Name)? – Snoop Dogg

With this classic, Snoop Dogg shows listeners why he was one of the most feared musicians of the 90s. This track absolutely slays. Sounding as fresh as it ever did, it reminds the listener of when Snoop Dogg was a menace. The year 1993 was a massive one for classic hits like this.

17. Worldwide Choppers – Tech N9ne Featuring Busta Rhymes, Yelawolf, Twisted Insane, Ceza, JL, Twista, U$O, And D-Loc

This 2013 song by Kansas City rapper Tech N9ne features a rapid-fire flow that washes past the listener almost before they can hear the sounds he’s spitting. The bass line is simple compared to other songs but effective for what it does, underlining the lyrics that Tech N9ne fires with speed.

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19. Summertime – DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince

Is there a more classic party jam? The first single from legend Will Smith’s 1991 studio album sizzles with the heat of its namesake season. Not much depth in the lyrics, though Smith’s flow is one of his best. This party song doesn’t need to be deep because it’s just fun and the summer sun.

20. “Wow.” – Post Malone

A killer track off of the album of the same name with a great bass line. “Wow” shows Post Malone at his strongest. His lyrics kill and the bass line snarls in the brain with earworm insistence. This track is impossible to ignore, and its bass will test the best speaker system.

21. Big Poppa – Notorious B.I.G.

From 1994’s Ready To Die, “Big Poppa” is a classic track from a decade of amazing music. Biggie’s classic flow is as fresh as the day it was written. This classic jam shows exactly how Notorious B.I.G. earned the “Notorious” part of his name. The man, the legend, rests in power.

22. Put On – Young Jeezy featuring Kanye West

Throwing back to 2009, hitting themes of poverty and power in the depths of the Great Recession, Young Jeezy’s “Put On” is a monster jam with a booming bass line and an absolute monster of a verse by Kanye West to close it out. One of the best songs of the late 2000s.

23. Believe Me – Lil Wayne

Lil Wayne’s 2014 single “Believe Me” was underrated at the time it came out. Put down as just another Lil Wayne song, it’s almost two songs in one with Lil Wayne and Drake trading off smoothly, their different rhymes working together to create one sound. Over time, it’s gotten a second look and more appreciation than it did when it first came out.

24. This Is How We Do It – Montell Jordan

This monster 1995 classic is one of the biggest party jams ever. It was relentless and ubiquitous anywhere from the club to the bedroom to the roller rink. Coming at the midpoint of the 90s, Montell Jordan took the last years of the Minneapolis Sound and mixed it with New Jack Swing to come up with something new and special.

25. I Am A God – Kanye West

Kanye West has become something of a joke of late, but when he’s on his game, he’s amazing. “I Am A God,” appropriately, celebrates both his ego and abilities. His powerful beats and flow are on display here. Among rap songs with good bass, this may be the best. For a song with such an arrogant title, West delivers on its promise.