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C#m Chord: How to Play the C Sharp Minor Guitar Chord

In music, as in life, it’s not all upbeat. Learning to play minor chords on the guitar will add depth and feeling to your music and will increase your range as a guitarist. 

Life has more good days than bad, and as a guitarist, you may play more major chords, but those transitional minor chords should also be a part of your repertoire.  

The C sharp minor guitar chord shows up in music from classical to rock. Songs in C#m include “And I Love Her” by The Beatles, “Shape of You” by Ed Sheeran, “Just Dance” by Lady Gaga, and “Counting Stars” by OneRepublic.  

What Is a C#m Chord? 

There are several different types of chords, but the two most well known are major and minor. The C#m chord is related to the C major guitar chord but has a more unique sound.  

Learning how to play C sharp minor will add to your skills as it will open a new range of songs you can play. You’ll especially enjoy C#m if you play acoustic guitar, as it is one of acoustic’s more beautiful chords. 

Five Ways to Play C#m 

The C sharp minor chord contains the notes C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A, and B. Learning how to play C sharp minor can be awkward at first for beginning guitarists, but with practice, you’ll get the hang of it. There are several ways you can play C#m, and here are a few of your options: 

C#m Version 1 

c sharp minor guitar chord chart with a barre on the third fret

A great way to play C#m is to put your index finger across the first five strings on the third fret (creating the barre), and your middle finger at the second string, fourth fret. The next two fingers should be on the third and fourth strings, fifth fret. Don’t play the sixth string.

More difficult barre: The notorious F chord

C#m Version 2 

c sharp minor chart played starting at first fret and with only three fingers

A three-finger version of C sharp minor can be played by placing your middle finger at the second fret, fourth string, first finger at the first fret at the third string, and third finger at the second fret at the second string. Strum closed.

C#m Version 3 

Place your third finger at the fourth fret along the fifth string, your first finger at the second fret on the fourth string, and the fourth finger at the fourth fret, third string, strumming from the fifth string. 

C#m Version 4 

Place your third finger at the sixth fret, fourth string, your fourth finger at the sixth fret along the third string, and your second finger at the fifth fret of the second string. Your first finger goes on the fourth fret on the first string. 

Try another 4 finger chord: B7 on guitar

C#m Version 5 

Place your first finger at the fourth fret at the first string, second finger at the fifth fret along the second string, and third finger at the sixth fret at the third string, and then strum from string three to one, only.

Try these options for playing C sharp minor to add feeling, depth, and transitions to the songs in your guitar repertoire. Also try the C sharp major chord counterpart while you’re learning this one! Pick which version you would like to play depending on the other chords in the song and which fingering provides the easiest changes. 

Try these chords next:

E flat major (Eb) guitar chord

D minor (Dm guitar chord)

Em (E minor guitar chord)

B major (B chord)

Last Updated on January 21, 2021 by Liam F. Admin