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13 Best Stripper Songs Ever (Great Strip Club Songs)

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A great experience in the strip club includes three important elements: Beautiful dancers, delicious drinks, and awesome music. Fortunately, you have plenty of options in the tunes department because rockin’ strip club songs are found in practically all genres and eras of music.

Here are the 13 best stripper songs ever created, ranging from popular favorites to lesser-known bangers. Get your request list ready!

1. Closer – Nine Inch Nails

Nine Inch Nails’ hit Closer is widely considered the definitive strip club anthem. After its debut in 1994, it immediately entered heavy rotation in clubs across the world, and it’s remained in steady play ever since. You’ll hear it near-nightly in practically every type of strip club everywhere.

Aside from the incredibly suggestive lyrics and seductive beat, Closer enjoys such sustained popularity as a strip club song because it’s so versatile. The song is slow enough for quiet times when there are only a few customers, but it’s also high-energy enough for times when the place is packed.

While many Nine Inch Nails songs are popular strip clubs, along with similar sounds from Ministry and My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult, Closer is the most requested tune within the genre.    

2. Pour Some Sugar on Me – Def Leppard

Unlike Closer, Pour Some Sugar on Me didn’t find instant success in the strip club. Instead, it was first a hit in regular clubs before quickly becoming a strip club favorite, which its remained for over 30 years.

Product Mutt Lange specifically set out to make the song sexy. Unlike similar heavy metal songs from the time, Pour Some Sugar on Me features big vocal harmonies and a slow pace. The result is a fun, catchy song that people love to sing along to.

Interestingly, the song almost didn’t make the final cut for 1987’s Hysteria. It was written and recorded after every other song on the album was already completed, making its inclusion an impulsive, last-minute decision.

3. Girls, Girls, Girls – Motley Crue

You can’t go wrong with a song that references real-life strip clubs from around the world, such as The Dollhouse in Ft. Lauderdale, The Tropicana in Los Angeles, and the Crazy Horse in Paris. Motley Crue’s tribute to the world of strip clubs remains as popular today as when it debuted over 30 years ago.

When it came time to shoot the video, the band, along with director Wayne Isham, scouted strip clubs throughout Los Angeles. While they found numerous real strippers with the perfect look, not all of them could dance well enough for a big-budget video. They wound up hiring non-erotic dancers for several key roles, including the fan-favorite, fishnet-clad brunette featured throughout.

4. Hot in Herre – Nelly

What originated in St. Louis, Missouri, is now a consistent favorite in strip clubs throughout the world. Nelly’s Hot in Herre is the rapper’s first number one hit on the Billboard 100 and the first Grammy ever awarded in the category of Best Male Rap Solo Performance.

The lyrics are especially well-suited for the strip club environment — “I am getting so hot, I wanna take my clothes off!” Plus, it’s backed by a catchy, bouncy beat, in no small part due to co-writer and Neptunes frontman Pharrell Williams.

5. Candy Shop – 50 Cent

50 Cent’s music catalog alternates between true-life-inspired tales of the criminal underworld and fun-loving bangers on heavy rotation in clubs and strip clubs the world over. In the second category, none is more popular among strippers than Candy Shop, a slow and seductive jam laden with double entendre.

Candy Shop dropped in 2005 as the second single from Fiddy’s second album, The Massacre. Although he was already famous, Candy Shop’s success helped him reach a much broader audience. It was nominated for Best Rap Song at the 2006 Grammy Awards, and the video received a nomination for Best Male Video at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards.

One noteworthy aspect of this song is that it was almost given to someone else. Producer Scott Storch originally created the beat with Fat Joe. However, when it came time to record, the heavyweight rapper decided the beat wasn’t right for him and gave Storch permission to work with Fiddy instead.

6. You Shook Me All Night Long – AC/DC

AC/DC songs are perpetually popular as stripper songs because they’re fast-paced and energetic but with enough rhythm to remain enjoyably danceable. While other songs, such as Thunderstruck and TNT, certainly enjoy heavy play in many strip clubs, You Shook Me All Night Long is arguably the most popular pick from the Aussie foursome.

Although the lyrics, including “She was a fast machine / She kept her motor clean,” might not be high art, there’s a fair amount of controversy about who wrote them. The song is the first released with then-new singer Brian Johnson, who replaced founding member Bon Scott after he died of alcohol poisoning. While Johnson is given official credit for the song, several of Scott’s close friends say many of the lines in the song were written by Scott years earlier.

7. I Just Wanna Love You (Give It 2 Me) – Jay-Z

Similar to 50 Cent, Jay-Z’s discography is incredibly varied, ranging from serious tales of crime to hits that get the whole club rocking. I Just Wanna Love U firmly falls into that second category, combining a sexy beat with good time lyrics.

The song references two famous strip clubs – Club Cheetah (in Atlanta, Georgia) and Club Amnesia (in Raleigh, North Carolina). As with Girls, Girls, Girls, real clubs in your song seems a surefire way of boosting its popularity in strip clubs everywhere.  

8. I Luv Dem Strippers – 2 Chainz with Nicki Minaj

Although arguably not one of the most widely-known songs in 2 Chainz’s discography, I Luv Dem Strippers enjoy consistent popularity as a strip club song. It’s a slow, sexy song about his love for strippers, featuring a dynamite guest appearance from Nicky Minaj.

While 2 Chainz undoubtedly loves strippers, he does seem to pay the price. A part of the song details how his girlfriend refuses to take his calls, presumably because he’s always at the strip club!

9. Shake That – Eminem with Nate Dogg

Shake That is one of three new songs featured on Eminem’s first greatest hits album, Curtain Call: The Hits, released in 2005. Although critical and commercial reception to the song is generally mixed, it found a home in many strip clubs, where it remains popular even 15 years later.

Aside from the lyrics, which find Eminem picking up women in a strip club, Nate Dogg provides a smooth and catchy hook. While this was the duo’s sixth collaboration, it, unfortunately, turned out to also be their last, as Nate Dogg passed away in 2011.  

10. Hot for Teacher – Van Halen

Released in 1984, Hot for Teacher is another strip club hit that’s typically much older than the dancers on the stage. It has powerhouse drumming, two guitar solos, and lyrics that end up more fun-loving than offensive, despite the song’s decidedly un-PC topic.

Of course, if you’re familiar with the song, you’re likely familiar with the video, too, which features two teachers stripping in the classroom. Don’t be surprised if you see dancers enacting the video on-stage, complete with caps and gowns.

11. Bad Girlfriend – Theory of a Deadman

Theory of a Deadman is a Canadian rock band perhaps best known for this song, an energetic rocker that describes all the ways a girl mistreats her boyfriend. According to lead singer Tyler Connolly, the song was written specifically as a stripper song.

It’s likely the only Theory of a Deadman song you’ll hear in a strip club, as it’s pretty different from their main sound, which is typically slower and more serious.

12. Back That Azz Up – Juvenile

Also widely heard as the censored version Back That Thang Up, Back That Azz Up was an instant classic when released in 1999. Not only was the rap song terrifically dirty, but it also spawned a particular type of suggestive dance seen in strip clubs and clubs even today.

Much of the song’s lingo and style remains popular. For example, Snoop Dogg’s Drop It Like It’s Hot, also a strip club hit, is often considered a direct extension of this song.

Not only was this Juvenile’s biggest hit up to that point in his career, but it’s also Lil Wayne’s first single. The song peaked at 19 on the Billboard Hot 100. Slow Motion, released in 2004, hit number one on the same chart. It’s a slower, more seductive song that’s also popular in strip clubs.

13. Milkshake – Kellis

It brings all the boys to the yard. Milkshake was a huge hit for a relatively unknown Kellis back in 2003. Although no one for sure knows what she’s referring to – Kellis famously won’t say – the lyrics are definitely dirty. When combined with a catchy, bouncy beat, it’s easy to see why Milkshake is a strip club song with an extensive appeal, especially when the place is packed with rowdy crowds.

Although Kellis never released a song with the same strip club appeal as Milkshake, many of her other songs have an infectious funkiness, as they’re produced by The Neptunes, a hit-making duo consisting of Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo.

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